All Projects are Not the Same

One of the big problems with successfully executing projects is that while we know projects are very different from each other, we often manage them and measure their success in the same way. Think for a moment about the oft quoted Standish reports in which project success is measured on the traditional iron triangle basis […]

    Making Self-Organization Work

     Discipline without freedom is tyranny; freedom without discipline is chaos (Cullen Hightower). Morning Star is the largest tomato processor in the United States with 400 employees and over $700 million in annual revenues. Morning Star’s CEO, Chris Rufer, built a successful company on the principle of self-management where everyone is responsible for coordinating with colleagues, customer, […]

      What do Leaders Want from Agile?

      I’ve just returned from a busy 4-week trip to Germany and Australia, and then Chicago. In shaking off the jet-lag cobwebs I took some time to reflect on this trip and others over the last 6-8 months (UK, Brazil, and the Agile Executive Summit). On these trips I’ve talked with many, many executives and managers […]

        Can-do Thinking Makes Risk Management Impossible

        “Can-do thinking makes risk management impossible. Since acknowledging real risk is defeatism, the risk management function in a can-do organization is restricted to dealing with those smallish risks that can be mitigated by quick action. That means you confront all the risks except the ones that really matter.” (Tom DeMarco, Why Does Software Cost So […]

          Interesting Posts

          There were quite a few interesting posts this past week–whose topics ranged from what motivates us to how we may have erred in fundamental assumptions about executive compensation. “Chaos Control Collaboration,” by Mary Abraham. Losing control, gaining collaboration, and social media. Holly Green, “Shifting from Strategic Planning to Strategic Agility,” in Forbes. “The huge flaw […]